CRTLE Speaker Series

Trauma-Informed Pedagogy in Turbulent Times

On October 2, 2020, in collaboration with the School of Social Work, CRTLE hosted this teaching seminar on how traumatic stress impacts student learning and how best we can mitigate it.

To be able to help students, we need to first be able to recognize trauma in ourselves. In this seminar, we will consider the neuroscience of traumatic stress and its impact on student learning. Specifically, we will address the impact of the ongoing pandemic and the long-ignored calls for racial justice on our sense of self and overall well-being. What lessons can we learn from neuroscience to help us better negotiate the pain and anxiety in ourselves and our students? How can we leverage the healing power of the community to help us move forward and help ourselves and our students continue to learn and thrive?

Session Resources:

Dr. Mays Imad

Dr. Mays Imad is a neuroscientist and professor of pathophysiology and biomedical ethics at Pima Community College, the founding coordinator of the Teaching and Learning Center, and a Gardner Institute Fellow. Dr. Imad’s current research focuses on stress, self-awareness, advocacy, and classroom community, and how these relate to cognition, metacognition, and, ultimately, student learning and success. Through her teaching and research, she seeks to provide her students with transformative opportunities that are grounded in the aesthetics of learning, truth-seeking, and self-realization. Dr. Imad received her undergraduate training in philosophy from the University of Michigan and her graduate training in Cellular and clinical neurobiology from Wayne State University-School of Medicine. 

Using Temporal Analytics to Detect Inconsistencies Between Learning Design and Student Engagement

On November 19, 2019, CRTLE hosted this teaching seminar on how learning and temporal analytics can aid in enhancing student engagement and learning design.

Learning analytics has the potential to make the temporal dimensions of learning processes more visible using fine-grained proxies of how and when students engage with online learning activities. In this talk, Dr. Quan Nguyen demonstrated the extent to which students actually follow the course timeline and the subsequent effect on their academic performance. He also discussed some on-going work and future research directions, such as the role of learning analytics in addressing the attainment gap of ethnic minority students, and outlier detection for time-on-task estimation.

Dr. Quan Nguyen is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Educational Data Science at the School of Information, University of Michigan. His research lies at the intersection of educational psychology and data science. His work focuses on exploring learning behavioral patterns of students by analysing their digital traces to understand 1) how teachers design courses in online learning environment, 2) how learning design influences student engagement, and 3) the temporal characteristics of learning behaviors and its relation to academic performance. Prior to joining UM, Dr. Nguyen was a PhD candidate in Learning Analytics at The Open University UK and an Associate Lecturer in Applied Statistics at the University of Arts London. He has a background in Economics (BSc. & MSc.) at Maastricht University, Netherlands.

Using Video to Humanize the Online Learning Experience

On September 30, 2019, CRTLE hosted this teaching seminar on how using video can enhance and humanize the online learning experience.

This seminar focused on three key elements of using video in order to humanize online learning spaces. This is relevant for instructors wanting to update their courses in Canvas. Dr. Kilgore covered effective practices for creating video announcements, discussions, and feedback, including improving video production quality while using common tools and technologies. Participants had the opportunity to create videos, share in a Canvas module, and set up captioning under universal design for learning principles.

Session Resources:

Picture of Dr. Whitney Kilgore

Whitney Kilgore, Ph.D. is Co-founder and Chief Academic Officer of iDesign, a partner to universities who wish to build, grow, and support online and blended course and program offerings. iDesign provides concierge, white-glove instructional design support to faculty partners, bringing expertise, service, and project structure to bear and ensuring that faculty feel comfortable, informed, and in control throughout the process. Her research interests are focused on learner experience design.

Dr. Kilgore has led the development of programs across the U.S., Spain, the

Philippines, China, Australia, Latin America, and the U.K. She is also an adjunct faculty at the University of North Texas (UNT) in the Learning Technologies graduate program. As an academic, Dr. Kilgore has received numerous recognitions for her work, including a research award from UNT and inclusion in the Top 10 Research Articles (co-authored with Aras Bozkurt of Turkey and Matt Crosslin from UTA) for 2017 list produced by Dublin City University for their work on Bot-Teachers in Hybrid Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs): A Post-Humanist Experience.

Whitney has been a part of the recent EdTech efficacy research project conducted in conjunction with Columbia University and the University of Virginia on EdTech Decision Making in Higher Education. She is currently working on research related to care theory in online learning and the impact to practice of humanizing online teaching and learning, and is deeply engaged in the Empirical Educator Project. She is an editor of the International Journal of Innovations in Online Education and recently edited and published the book Humanizing Online Teaching and Learning as an open educational resource. Her next edited book, entitled Connecting the Dots: Book: Improving Student Outcomes with Exceptional Instructional Design, is scheduled to be available as an OER at the end of 2019.

Designing the Learner Experience: 7 Keys to Unlock the Human Element in Online Courses

On April 22, 2019, CRTLE hosted this teaching seminar on how to create a more connected learning experience for students.

Students have more options than ever before when choosing an online program and are becoming more savvy shoppers. Differentiating a program from others in the market will increasingly rely upon the design of the student experience. If you are looking for ways to increase student satisfaction and engagement in your course or program then a focus on the human element is essential. In this presentation, Dr. Kilgore outlines findings from her research on humanizing online teaching and learning, shares the quick easy wins to create a more connected learning experience for students.

Picture of Dr. Whitney Kilgore

Whitney Kilgore, Ph.D. is Co-founder and Chief Academic Officer of iDesign, a partner to universities who wish to build, grow, and support online and blended course and program offerings. iDesign provides concierge, white-glove instructional design support to faculty partners, bringing expertise, service, and project structure to bear and ensuring that faculty feel comfortable, informed, and in control throughout the process. Her research interests are focused on learner experience design.

Dr. Kilgore has led the development of programs across the U.S., Spain, the

Philippines, China, Australia, Latin America, and the U.K. She is also an adjunct faculty at the University of North Texas (UNT) in the Learning Technologies graduate program. As an academic, Dr. Kilgore has received numerous recognitions for her work, including a research award from UNT and inclusion in the Top 10 Research Articles (co-authored with Aras Bozkurt of Turkey and Matt Crosslin from UTA) for 2017 list produced by Dublin City University for their work on Bot-Teachers in Hybrid Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs): A Post-Humanist Experience.

Whitney has been a part of the recent EdTech efficacy research project conducted in conjunction with Columbia University and the University of Virginia on EdTech Decision Making in Higher Education. She is currently working on research related to care theory in online learning and the impact to practice of humanizing online teaching and learning, and is deeply engaged in the Empirical Educator Project. She is an editor of the International Journal of Innovations in Online Education and recently edited and published the book Humanizing Online Teaching and Learning as an open educational resource. Her next edited book, entitled Connecting the Dots: Book: Improving Student Outcomes with Exceptional Instructional Design, is scheduled to be available as an OER at the end of 2019.